The Gender Centre Library

To borrow from our library you will first need to become a member of the library. To join our library you will need to provide identification (perhaps your driver's license or pension card), and a telephone contact. This information will be reviewed every time you borrow a book.

You will be able to borrow one book at a time, for up to two weeks at a time. This is due to the limited number of books available and the high demand from the community. Please take good care of our books, many of our resources have been removed or taken from our service and not returned. This is very unfortunate as they are part of quite a unique resource in New South Wales

Our books are purchased in limited quantities and appear on our Book List when available. If there is a book you feel the Gender Centre should have in our Library, please let us know.

You may request to submit a Lend Request to Borrow a  Book from our Library from the Catalogue below.

We also have a link to buy the Books on Amazon if you would like to.

You may also consider donating a book to the Centre if you feel it may be a valuable resource to others in our community.

All Library Resources: Intersex and Identity: The Contested Self

Title:      Intersex and Identity: The Contested Self
Categories:      Intersex
ResourceID:      0813532299
Authors:      Sharon E. Preves
ISBN-10(13):      0813532299
Publisher:      Rutgers University Press
Publication date:      2003-04-08
Number of pages:      232
Language:      Not specified
Price:      22.98 USD
Rating:      0 
Picture:      cover           Button Buy now Buy now
Description:     

 

 

Product Description

Approximately one in every two thousand infants born in America each year is sexually ambiguous in such a way that doctors cannot immediately determine the child’s sex. Some children’s chromosomal sexuality contradicts their sexual characteristics. Others have the physical traits of both sexes, or of neither. Is surgical intervention or sex assignment of intersexed children necessary for their physical and psychological health, as the medical and mental health communities largely assume? Should parents raise sexually ambiguous children as one gender or another and keep them ignorant of their medical history?

Drawing upon life history interviews with adults who were treated for intersexuality as children, Sharon E. Preves explores how such individuals experience and cope with being labeled sexual deviants in a society that demands sexual conformity.  Preves frames their stories within a sociological discussion of gender, the history of intersex medicalization, the recent political mobilization of intersexed adults, and the implications of their activism on identity negotiation, medical practice, and cultural norms. By demonstrating how intersexed people manage and create their own identities, often in conflict with their medical diagnosis, Preves argues that medical intervention into intersexuality often creates, rather than mitigates, the stigma these people suffer.

 


Product Description

Approximately one in every two thousand infants born in America each year is sexually ambiguous in such a way that doctors cannot immediately determine the child’s sex. Some children’s chromosomal sexuality contradicts their sexual characteristics. Others have the physical traits of both sexes, or of neither. Is surgical intervention or sex assignment of intersexed children necessary for their physical and psychological health, as the medical and mental health communities largely assume? Should parents raise sexually ambiguous children as one gender or another and keep them ignorant of their medical history?

Drawing upon life history interviews with adults who were treated for intersexuality as children, Sharon E. Preves explores how such individuals experience and cope with being labeled sexual deviants in a society that demands sexual conformity.  Preves frames their stories within a sociological discussion of gender, the history of intersex medicalization, the recent political mobilization of intersexed adults, and the implications of their activism on identity negotiation, medical practice, and cultural norms. By demonstrating how intersexed people manage and create their own identities, often in conflict with their medical diagnosis, Preves argues that medical intervention into intersexuality often creates, rather than mitigates, the stigma these people suffer.



Product Description

Approximately one in every two thousand infants born in America each year is sexually ambiguous in such a way that doctors cannot immediately determine the child’s sex. Some children’s chromosomal sexuality contradicts their sexual characteristics. Others have the physical traits of both sexes, or of neither. Is surgical intervention or sex assignment of intersexed children necessary for their physical and psychological health, as the medical and mental health communities largely assume? Should parents raise sexually ambiguous children as one gender or another and keep them ignorant of their medical history?

Drawing upon life history interviews with adults who were treated for intersexuality as children, Sharon E. Preves explores how such individuals experience and cope with being labeled sexual deviants in a society that demands sexual conformity.  Preves frames their stories within a sociological discussion of gender, the history of intersex medicalization, the recent political mobilization of intersexed adults, and the implications of their activism on identity negotiation, medical practice, and cultural norms. By demonstrating how intersexed people manage and create their own identities, often in conflict with their medical diagnosis, Preves argues that medical intervention into intersexuality often creates, rather than mitigates, the stigma these people suffer.



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