The Gender Centre Library

To borrow from our library you will first need to become a member of the library. To join our library you will need to provide identification (perhaps your driver's license or pension card), and a telephone contact. This information will be reviewed every time you borrow a book.

You will be able to borrow one book at a time, for up to two weeks at a time. This is due to the limited number of books available and the high demand from the community. Please take good care of our books, many of our resources have been removed or taken from our service and not returned. This is very unfortunate as they are part of quite a unique resource in New South Wales

Our books are purchased in limited quantities and appear on our Book List when available. If there is a book you feel the Gender Centre should have in our Library, please let us know.

You may request to submit a Lend Request to Borrow a  Book from our Library from the Catalogue below.

We also have a link to buy the Books on Amazon if you would like to.

You may also consider donating a book to the Centre if you feel it may be a valuable resource to others in our community.

All Library Resources: Men in Women's Clothing: Anti-theatricality and Effeminization, 1579-1642 (Cambridge Studies in Renaissance Literature and Culture)

Title:      Men in Women's Clothing: Anti-theatricality and Effeminization, 1579-1642 (Cambridge Studies in Renaissance Literature and Culture)
Categories:      Gender Studies
ResourceID:      052146627X
Authors:      Laura Levine
ISBN-10(13):      052146627X
Publisher:      Cambridge University Press
Publication date:      1994-11-25
Edition:      First
Number of pages:      196
Language:      Not specified
Price:      25.81 USD
Rating:      0 
Picture:      cover           Button Buy now Buy now
Description:     

Product Description
In 1597 anti-theatricalist Stephen Gosson made the curious remark that theatre 'effeminized' the mind. Four years later Phillip Stubbes claimed that male actors who wore women's clothing could literally 'adulterate' male gender and fifty years after this in a tract which may have hastened the closing of the theatres, William Prynne described a man whom women's clothing had literally caused to 'degenerate' into a women. How can we account for such fears of effeminization and what did Renaissance playwrights do with such a legacy? Laura Levine examines the ways in which Shakespeare, Marlowe and Jonson addressed a generation's anxieties about gender and the stage and identifies the way the same 'magical thinking' informed documents we much more readily associate with extreme forms of cultural paranoia: documents dedicated to the extermination of witches.

Reviews