The Gender Centre Library

To borrow from our library you will first need to become a member of the library. To join our library you will need to provide identification (perhaps your driver's license or pension card), and a telephone contact. This information will be reviewed every time you borrow a book.

You will be able to borrow one book at a time, for up to two weeks at a time. This is due to the limited number of books available and the high demand from the community. Please take good care of our books, many of our resources have been removed or taken from our service and not returned. This is very unfortunate as they are part of quite a unique resource in New South Wales

Our books are purchased in limited quantities and appear on our Book List when available. If there is a book you feel the Gender Centre should have in our Library, please let us know.

You may request to submit a Lend Request to Borrow a  Book from our Library from the Catalogue below.

We also have a link to buy the Books on Amazon if you would like to.

You may also consider donating a book to the Centre if you feel it may be a valuable resource to others in our community.

All Library Resources: Hunger Strike: The Anorectic's Struggle as a Metaphor for Our Age

Title:      Hunger Strike: The Anorectic's Struggle as a Metaphor for Our Age
Categories:      Health, Medical & Self-Help
ResourceID:      1855753774
Authors:      Susie Orbach
ISBN-10(13):      1855753774
Publisher:      Karnac Books
Publication date:      2005-01-01
Edition:      New Ed
Number of pages:      0
Language:      Not specified
Price:      15.79 USD
Rating:      0 
Picture:      cover           Button Buy now Buy now
Description:     

Product Description
In her examination of the anorectic's struggle, Susie Orbach sees women's eating problems as symbolizing the battle for autonomy in which every woman is engaged by identifying the first and most important arena of contention, a woman's body. As the author demonstrates, a woman's obsessive monitoring, severe reduction in food intake and the accompanying bingeing are a reflection of society's demands that she does not take up too much space, that she looks a certain way in order to be acceptable and that she curtails her needs in general. Yet anorexia also expresses a rebellion againts such ideas. It is, at another level, a cry of protest, a hunger strike against the contradictory and intolerable demands women face in contemporary society. In a new introduction, Susie Orbach discusses current attitudes towards eating problems and how they have changed over the last several years, and in a newly revised final chapter, she proposes an innovative approach to residential treatment that utilizes the meanings of anorexia to the sufferer as a basis for a therapy. The author also wrote "Fat is a Feminist Issue".

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