The Gender Centre Library

To borrow from our library you will first need to become a member of the library. To join our library you will need to provide identification (perhaps your driver's license or pension card), and a telephone contact. This information will be reviewed every time you borrow a book.

You will be able to borrow one book at a time, for up to two weeks at a time. This is due to the limited number of books available and the high demand from the community. Please take good care of our books, many of our resources have been removed or taken from our service and not returned. This is very unfortunate as they are part of quite a unique resource in New South Wales

Our books are purchased in limited quantities and appear on our Book List when available. If there is a book you feel the Gender Centre should have in our Library, please let us know.

You may request to submit a Lend Request to Borrow a  Book from our Library from the Catalogue below.

We also have a link to buy the Books on Amazon if you would like to.

You may also consider donating a book to the Centre if you feel it may be a valuable resource to others in our community.

All Library Resources: Fighting for Life: Contest, Sexuality, and Consciousness
 

Title:      Fighting for Life: Contest, Sexuality, and Consciousness
Categories:      Gender Studies
ResourceID:      0801478456
Authors:      Walter J. Ong
ISBN-10(13):      0801478456
Publisher:      Cornell University Press
Publication date:      2012-11-06
Edition:      1
Number of pages:      240
Language:      Not specified
Price:      25.37 USD
Rating:      0 
Picture:      cover           Button Buy now Buy now
Description:     

Product Description

What accounts for the popularity of the macho image, the fanaticism of sports enthusiasts, and the perennial appeal of Don Quixote's ineffectual struggles? In Fighting for Life, Walter J. Ong addresses these and related questions, offering insight into the role of competition in human existence. Focusing on the ways in which human life is affected by contest, Ong argues that the male agonistic drive finds an outlet in games as divergent as football and chess.

Demonstrating the importance of contest in biological evolution and in the growth of consciousness out of the unconscious, Ong also shows how adversary procedure has affected social, linguistic, and intellectual history. He discusses shifting patterns of contest in such arenas as spectator sports, politics, business, academia, and religion. Human beings' internalization of agonistic drives, he concludes, can foster the deeper discovery of the self and of distinctively human freedom.



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