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Hepatitis C

hep c logoHepatitis C is an infectious disease affecting the liver which is caused by the hepatitis C virus (or more simply H.C.V) which is passed from one person to another through blood to blood contact. (i.e. sharing needles or injecting equipment or through unsafe tattooing or piercing methods).

The Hepatitis C section of the Gender Centre's website contains a number of articles about hepatitis C and once established it will also include other resources such as books and book reviews, research papers, videos, links to other hepatitis C related websites and services and more. The articles below are just a few of the articles currently on the Hepatitis C page of this website.

HEPATITIS N.S.W. NEWEST WEAPON IN THE EDUCATION ARSENAL

Article appeared in Polare 96, July 2013

The average age for initiation into injecting drug use is nineteen. Without proper knowledge of how to stay safe, young people who start injecting are at serious risk of infection withH.I.V., hepatitis B and hepatitis C. Hepatitis N.S.W.aim to combat this risk with the 'C me' campaign ... 

PREPARING FOR TREATMENT

Article appeared in Polare 97, October 2013

Preparing for Hepatitis C treatment can involve an amount of prior planning that not many people may be aware of. In order for the treatment to be successful, it's a good idea to get the timing right, ensuring that you're prepared for any potential side-effects, seeking out professional and personal support and have dealt with the issue of alcohol intake ... 

A MEMBER OF THE FLAVIVIRUS FAMILY

Hepatitis Australia Article appeared in Polare magazine January 2016

The hepatitis C virus is a member of the flavivirus family of ribonucleic acid (RNA) viruses. The virus reproduces by making many copies of itself in liver cells. The hepatitis C virus does not kill liver cells directly, but the immune response initiated by the presence of the virus in the liver can cause liver inflammation and cell death. (Farrell, G.C. 2002) There are six main genotypes (strains) of hepatitis C. Each genotype contains numerous subtypes, labelled a, b, or c. Genotypes 1a and 1b (54 percent prevalence) and 3a (37 percent prevalence) are the most common genotypes in Australia. (McCaw, R., et al. 1997) Hepatitis C was discovered by scientists in 1988 and found to be responsible for most of the cases of 'non-A, non-B hepatitis'. Early studies confirmed that hepatitis C was spread through blood-to-blood contact. An accurate test to diagnose hepatitis C became available in Australia in 1990. The test detected antibodies produced in reaction to the hepatitis C virus...

AN UPDATE ON THE INFECTIOUS DISEASE AFFECTING THE LIVER

Article appeared in Polare 93, October 2012

Transmission of H.C.V. is nearly always through blood to blood contact, but unlikeH.I.V., the virus can survive longer outside of the body. This article takes an updated look at the virus that about 1 in 200 people carry in Australia ... 

AFFECTING ABOUT 1 IN 200 PEOPLE IN AUSTRALIA

Article appeared in Polare 16, December 1996

When someone catches Hepatitis C, the body produces antibodies to try to destroy it. Most often, the antibody response fails to identify the virus properly and it evades the body's defence system, the infection remains long-term and people don't know that they have the virus ...

NARRATIVE OF CHAOS AND QUEST

Article appeared in Polare 76, October 2008

Hepatitis C is stigmatized primarily because of its connection with illicit drug use and public ignorance and fear around transmission. This article provides a brief outline of findings from a research study that explored people's experiences living with Hepatitis C ... 

OF HEP C TREATMENT

by Adrian Rigg, Freelance Health Writer and Contributor to Hep Review magazine.  This article was reprinted from Hep Review Article appeared in Polare magazine October 2014.

here are strategies to minimise treatment side effects; the more you know about this before starting treatment, the better. You cannot overstate the importance of reducing the impact of side effects by being prepared for, and dealing with, side effects that can be minimised or eliminated. This means being aware of the reactions you may experience, such as appetite loss, rashes and insomnia, and having some strategies in place to deal with them: the sooner they are minimised, the easier it will be to continue treatment. Depression and mental health problems can arise during treatment, especially for people with a history of these...

PAPER PRESENTED TO THE AUSTRALIAN SOCIAL POLICY CONFERENCE

Article appeared in Polare 67, April 2006

Hepatitis C is an infectious, virulent and resilient blood borne virus. Globally, it is estimated to have infected around 170 million people and the epidemic is rapidly spreading. New infections in Australia increased by 45 percent between 1997 and 2001 to 16,000 annually ... 

A STUDY INTO LIFE AFTER HEP. C TREATMENTS

Article appeared in Polare 85, October 2010

Dr. Max Hopwood is a researcher at the National Centre in H.I.V. Social Research.His study into the post-treatment health of those with Hepatitis C, reveals some alarming results particularly with the prolonged effect of treatment drugs on the central nervous system ...

EXPLORING THE STRATEGIES USED BY PEOPLE WHO HAVE INJECT BUT HAVE AVOIDED HEPATITIS C INFECTION

Article appeared in Polare 93, October 2012

Professor Carla Treloar from the National Centre for H.I.V. Social Research discusseshow some people who have injected illicit drugs for many years manage to avoid hepatitis C infection and some of the main findings in the U.S. from Dr. Sam Friedman's Staying Safe study ...

AN OVERVIEW

Article appeared in Polare 73, October 2007

Stigma can lead to people experiencing chronic stress giving rise to resistant approaches to coping, like withdrawal and isolation. In certain contexts, the impact of the meaning of a disease or condition may create more problems for an individual than the disease itself ... 

CLUSTER ANALYSIS REVEALS SYMPTOM TRIGGERS AND RELIEF STRATEGIES

Article appeared in Polare 72, July 2007

Since 1999, Carolyn Lang's research has had a major impact on the quality of life of people with Hep. C infection. One of the results of her research has been the discovery that clusters of severe symptoms occurred, and are prevalent among people living with H.C.V. infection ...

WHAT IS HEALTH LITERACY

Article appeared in Polare 100, August 2014 2007

Freelance writer and Hep Review magazine contributor, Adrian Rigg looks at Health Literacy, the ability for individuals to take better control of their health and its overall benefit to society as a whole ...

UP CLOSE AND PERSONAL

Article appeared in Polare 85, October 2010

The Hepatitis C Virus (H.C.V.) is a very clever little creature. It has spread worldwide, affecting humans, and one type of chimpanzee, and is able to outwit most people's immune system due to its unstable R.N.A. (ribonucleic acid) genetic make up ...

 
 
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